Hunting Goanna

I am feeling rather ambivalent about yesterday. I took some lads hunting way out in the bush about an hour down the Canning stock route in an area I have not visited before.

They were after goanna.  Frankly, I was not really expecting to see them succeed. However, they killed two beautiful specimens, both quit big – around one and a half metres in length.  On the one hand I was sad to see these fascinating creatures killed.  On the other I was impressed to see the young teenagers using their tracking skills to follow the trail of a lizard well over a kilometre until they ran it to its lair, dug it out and killed it.

The chase started when one of them spotted the sign of a goanna that had walked across the track we were following.  They were out of the troopy in an instant, dashing barefoot through the spinifex, picking up the trail intermittently and following the lizard’s path for nearly half an hour before they ran it to ground.  Then they dug until they could seize it by the tail, pull it out of its hole and swing it around to dash its head on the hard earth.  I filmed the process on iPad, but I am not going to post the movie.  It is disturbing.

Instead here is a photo of a goanna I took on another occasion. One that was not killed.

goanna.jpg

Two lizards died. Predators predated.  Two families enjoyed meals of something they enjoy as much as we gardia enjoy our roast turkey or pork. The boys did well.  Best of all we had some good talking time.

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About Alan

Settling into my 7th decade and still determined not to grow up too soon.
This entry was posted in autobiography, Photography, travel, Wildlife and tagged , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

2 Responses to Hunting Goanna

  1. I understand your ambivalence but as someone who has the luxury of ‘believing’ food comes from supermarkets I should probably refrain from comment. Just a reminder of how a vast proportion make a living.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Alan says:

      The opportunity for a healthy diet is limited here by both the availability of suitable groceries and, frequently, of the wherewithal to purchase. Bush tucker provides an opportunity to eat and to maintain connection with the traditional ways. I console myself with the fact the land is vast, and settlements are few and far between. It is not too likely that the edible wildlife will suffer from over hunting in this area at least.

      Like

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