Kickin’ Through the Leaves

My advice on letting go your inhibitions and and kicking through the leaves:

Anywhere else; do it.  

Here; Don’t.

Rotation of snake08556.jpg
Deathadder

 

Originally this snake was known as the “deaf adder” due to the fact it stays completely still when approached.  This caused people to believe these snakes were deaf, but like most snakes, the death adder can sense vibrations.  It stays motionless in order to ambush passing prey.  Sometimes it hides under leaves and exposes just the end of its tail, twitching it as if it belonged to a small lizard.  This attracts suitable prey.  A death adder would not usually attack anything too big to eat but it will strike at a human or larger animal if it feels threatened.  Most people who get bitten have stumbled upon it or have actually tried to attack it.  The bite was 60% likely to be fatal before the advent of antivenin, which probably accounts for the name morphing to death adder.

The death adder has the fastest strike of all snakes, so it pays to keep out of its reach.  I learned how from the legendary Bob Cooper himself.  Retrieving and relocating one is easy, with the right equipment.   Gently sliding the hook under it in the middle does not disturb it, and when you lift, the tapered design of the hook makes it hard for the snake to slide off.  Then you gently grasp it with the specially designed “gotchas” which hold firmly without harming the snake.  Transfer it to a container (with a lid) and transport it to safety somewhere well away from where people walk – in this case without anyone in the community even being aware of it having been here.  They would have insisted on killing it.

 

Author: Uisce úr

Though I am old with wandering Through hollow lands and hilly lands, I will find out where she has gone, And kiss her lips and take her hands; And walk among long dappled grass, And pluck till time and times are done, The silver apples of the moon, The golden apples of the sun.

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