A List.

In my opinion. Best SF Films of all Time
A list. Not in any way to be considered definitive. The list is in no particular order. It would be impossible to objectively rank these movies. Chosen because they came immediately to mind and because aside from being well directed and performed they were well written and had great special effects for their time. Also they contributed to human philosophy and weren’t just cowboys and first nations in space. So you won’t see Star Wars here. Alien just squeaked in. I tried to choose ten, but settled for fifteen. Correction , eighteen
Ok, twenty one two. There are more, no doubt, that should be on this list. The not-so-subtle racism of Planet of the Apes probably should keep it off. I’m open to debate. Either way, I just mentioned it.

The List

  • Metropolis – the 1927 original
  • Blade Runner
  • Blade Runner 2049
  • Gattaca
  • Predestination
  • 2001 A Space Odyssey
  • Twelve Monkeys
  • Moon
  • A Clockwork Orange
  • Ghost in the Shell (original animation)
  • Brazil
  • Solaris (1976 version)
  • Back to the Future – all three
  • Alien – although it is really a gothic horror set in space
  • Aliens – maybe… after that the franchise went awry.
  • Gravity. Some far-fetched plot devices but otherwise almost perfect. Stunning soundtrack.
  • Forbidden Planet (1956)
  • The Day the Earth Stood Still (1951)
  • A Boy and His Dog

Oh, and one more. Special mention:

I Married a Monster from Outer Space (1958) – Because it is the first SF film I ever saw. I was probably ten years old. It stirred my imagination. When I saw it again years later, I realised it was remarkably underrated as a B Movie. In 2001 I noticed a distinct similarity to its plot in The Astronaut’s Wife, which, despite having Charlize Theron, does not make my list.

The Beautiful Blue Danube

Sometimes I wonder about how my mind works. My neighbour’s morning coughing spell today sounded to me like The Blue Danube.

Cough, cough, cough, cough cough

Cough cough, cough cough

Cough Cough cough cough cough

Cough cough cough cough

Cough cough cough cough COUGH

Cough cough COUGH

Cough cough cough

Cough cough

cough cough

AHEM

Johann Strauss II

Gave me an earworm.

Curiosity

The first movie I saw as a child was Disney’s Fantasia. I liked it. The Night on Bald Mountain segment scared the Willy out of me. I must have been about four years old. The second movie I ever saw was The Wizard of Oz. Probably in the same year, late 1956 or early 1957. My Dad had told me that he had seen The Wizard of Oz when he was a child, and the flying monkeys scene had frightened him. I was prepared to be scared by the monkeys, but I wasn’t. The bit that scared me was the floating green head.

A memory associated with one of those films, though I can’t recall which, was my amazement at learning one could get an orange drink in a cardboard box and you drink it through a straw inserted through a hole in the top.

It was the first time I remember setting my brain to work at a scientific question. I tried to figure out how liquid could be in a cardboard box without making it soggy.

I’m proud to say my budding intellect solved the conundrum. Wax. The paper was waxed. I realised that wax had the property of repelling water.

My first intellectual foray into Curiosity. My first hypothesis that I can remember.

I have always since had a fondness for tetrapaks. A clever invention.

A Little Moore Poetry


’TIS the last rose of summer
Left blooming alone;
All her lovely companions
Are faded and gone;
No flower of her kindred,
No rosebud is nigh,
To reflect back her blushes,
To give sigh for sigh.

I’ll not leave thee, thou lone one!
To pine on the stem;
Since the lovely are sleeping,
Go, sleep thou with them.
Thus kindly I scatter
Thy leaves o’er the bed,
Where thy mates of the garden
Lie scentless and dead.

So soon may I follow,
When friendships decay,
And from Love’s shining circle
The gems drop away.
When true hearts lie withered
And fond ones are flown,
Oh! who would inhabit
This bleak world alone?


Thomas Moore